NEW BOOK

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Learning to Stutter by Sherm Davis--A Book That Redefines Humanity




Welcome to my tour stop of "Learning to Stutter" by Sherm Davis, presented by Elite Book Tours.  To follow the full tour, please visit here.

BUY NOW @ AMAZON!


Kenneth Kocher seems to have it all - a good heart, a sense of humor, decent looks, and lots of money. What he doesn't have is something most of us take for granted - freedom of speech. Kenneth lives with a severe stutter which has wreaked havoc with his life since childhood.

After much embarrassment, pain and soul-searching, Kenneth realizes that to free his inner self he must accept the fact that he cannot be cured, and that he must learn to stutter with grace. Along the way he meets another stutterer and a young widow who are both dealing with the stumbling blocks in their own lives.

Using an experimental syntax to portray the neurological component of the syndrome, the novel gives the reader a unique view of stuttering from the inside out.



PRAISES FOR "LEARNING TO STUTTER"

This is an extraordinary book. It’s the inside dope on stuttering. And if one person was born to tell the story, it’s David Sherman. And does he have a story to tell. The plot is consummate, the writing proficient, the pacing skillful, with a clarity of detail that renders it very realistic. After awhile, I found myself caring about all the characters, even (or particularly) the minor ones, oftentimes because they reminded me of myself, and were therefore incredible familiar. It is a reflection of the author’s versatility –as educator, in math and Language Arts, as musician and writer –and diversity –Jewish, New York born and bred, having resided all over the world –that some parts of the writing even speak to the Oriental in me. As each of the characters, stuttering and non-, go about their lives, problem-solving, adapting, you cannot help but see the parables at a universal level. Resonant, poignant, and ultimately elucidatory, this book get an A+ from me.

---- Ling T., Guatemala

In addition to those who struggle with dysfluency and their friends and family, I highly recommend this novel to educators and speech pathologists to ensure their understanding of the multi-faceted impact that this neurological syndrome can have on one’s identity.

---- Shari Mayerson, MS, CCC-SLP


EXCERPT FROM "LEARNING TO STUTTER"

Why is the name so difficult? Perhaps because there is no way to reach into the verbal bag of tricks which every person who stutters carries with him in a desperate attempt to seem normal. Word substitution (the favorite of all stutterers who block more on certain sounds than others) is impossible when the name is fixed and finite. Linking the end of one sound to the start of another to increase fluidity is impossible also, because the name begins with a specific sound, and most stuttering occurs on the initial syllable of a word.
But the great author, unaware of Kenneth Kocher’s internal trauma, was in a hurry, and only scribbled his name and gave a cursory nod before moving on to the next person in line. It was only as he was walking away that KK realized that he was fixating on his own name, and hadn’t said a single word to one of his personal heroes.
On the heels of this humiliation, he still had one more errand to run, and it was better to get it over with early in the day. When he entered the toy and game store, he really didn’t know what he was looking for. He walked up and down the aisles of the small shop, but couldn’t find anything that struck his fancy. Finally the shopkeeper, a jovial man in his fifties, horseshoe bald with a red pate and dramatic waxed moustache like the character from Monopoly, came over and played the part.
“What are you looking for, son?”
“A gift for my six-year-old nephew,” was the sentence that formed itself with perfect clarity, sonority and resonance in his brain. But just after the sentence was formed, he scanned ahead and found a stutter reflex embedded in the /g/ in gift. Automatically, he sought to substitute a synonym, but in this case he couldn’t even substitute the word present, because the /p/ was his nemesis, the hardest sound in the lexicon and one to be avoided at almost any cost. So he got past the opening vowel and then hit the hard /g/ like an electric fence. His larynx locked and he started pushing against it with brute force, but it wouldn’t budge. His face and neck started twitching, and his left eye was blinking out of control. The harder he pushed, the harder he jerked and twitched.[1]
Finally he caught hold of himself and let go of his breath. Inhaling anew, he substituted one sound for another. “^Ssssssomething fffffor mmmmy nephew.” It was stilted and spasmodic, but got the point across, more or less.
He could see the surprise in the storekeeper’s face, but he was used to seeing this. All his life, he had been watching people try to figure out how to respond to his twisted speaking voice.
“Well,” the man said, maintaining an amiable front, “what is your nephew like?”
The second interaction of the day, and it wasn’t going well, either. He was floundering in a neurological rut, and he couldn’t make it stop. His larynx slammed shut on its own accord, his left arm shot into the air like it was connected to an invisible string, and the muscles in his face and neck began quivering under the strain. He pulled himself together and responded slowly, too slowly, “^~I…. ^d-d-don’t know. I nnnnnever see him.”
“Hmm,” the shopkeeper tugged at his moustache. “That makes it a bit more difficult, but I’m sure we have something. Are you looking for something educational, mechanical, sports-oriented, or just plain fun?”
He shrugged his shoulders. “Sssomething he ‡can ^g-grow into.”
The paunchy man nodded sagely from behind his suspenders and his bowtie. “I’ve got just the thing,” he said, and went into the back roozm. The shopkeeper returned with a magnetic construction set, simple enough for a young boy but advanced enough for his father to enjoy as well, and handed him the box. “What do you think?”
KK nodded his appreciation and gave a thumbs-up, too taut to say anything. On other days, he might have made the effort to ask the man to gift-wrap the box, but when a day began like this, every word was precious.
“This is a gift for a nephew who lives far away?” the man deduced. “Would you like me to wrap it for you?”
Exhaling a sigh of relief for the man’s telepathy and compassion, KK nodded his head and handed him a credit card. Walking out of that toy store, he was unable to even thank the man. Cursing himself and vowing to never shop in a store again for as long as he lived – he’d shop online instead – he stuffed the gift in his backpack and started power walking through the streets.

OTHER BOOKS FROM SHERM DAVIS



This bilingual English/Spanish collection contains pieces ranging from flash fiction to folktale. Set in New York, New & Old Mexico, Guatemala, Italy, and the future, eight morsels of Zap Fiction lead off the collection, and five longer stories close it out. The Spanish translations, the product of a team of professionals, are as true to the original English as possible. 

Buy NOW @ AmazonCreatespace

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Howard Sherman Davis is a writer, musician and international educator who has taught in five countries on four continents. Born in Brooklyn, New York, and raised on Long Island, he currently lives by Lake Atitl├ín in Guatemala. His journalism and fiction have appeared in the United States, Canada, Guatemala, and online. 






Cheers,
 Jassie

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Busy, Stressed And Food Obsessed by Lisa Lewtan

Hi. Once again, we bring forward to you an intriguing blog tour with a book before us with a powerful message.

Welcome to the blog tour of "Busy, Stressed, and Food Obsessed" by Lisa Lewtan.  The full schedule for the tour can be found here.

BOOK DESCRIPTION

When stress comes knocking, we eat. When we’re celebrating, we eat. When we’re happy, sad, angry, bored, or relaxed, we eat. Whether we feel good about our bodies or loathe what we see in the mirror, we eat. And often, we hate ourselves for it.

Diets don’t work. “No pain, no gain” tactics are emotionally and physically draining and ineffective, and they often employ shame and guilt—two excellent motivators for comfort eating.

Food is the ultimate double-crosser. It provides pleasure and pain in equal measure, but unlike people, you can’t break up with food. Instead, you need to change how you think and relate to food so you reap the positives without letting it drive you to distraction.

Healthy living strategist and personal coach Lisa Lewtan has the answer: an honest exploration of your relationship with food. Through mindfulness exercises and self-examination, you’ll learn to identify the chemical and emotional triggers that encourage you to eat and how to live a life where food strengthens, rather than weakens.

Busy, Stressed, and Food Obsessed! offers a chance to transform your frenemy into a true friend. You deserve a healthy and delicious relationship with the food you eat.

“A rich and powerful book which provides a roadmap to understanding yourself and your body.” — Christine Schuster, President & CEO, Emerson Hospital

“A simple, readable format that is a valuable tool for anyone who is eager to do the work to transform their life!” —Marcy Balter, Board Chair, Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health

Buy now @ Amazon


5 REASONS WHY YOU NEED TO READ THIS BOOK:


1. Get over the diet mentality and STOP beating yourself up about not always eating perfectly

2. Ditch the shame, guilt, and hardcore "no pain, no gain" tactics that do NOT work

3. Identify your OWN chemical and emotional triggers in order to conquer cravings for good

4. Incorporate the BEST mindfulness practices to slow down and reconnect with your body

5. Discover what truly nourishes you so that you can FINALLY stop thinking about food all the time

EXCERPT

For those of us who are busy, stressed, and food obsessed, sometimes food is our best friend and, at other times, our worst enemy. We eat because we are tired, happy, sad, lonely, anxious, bored, excited, triggered, and sometimes, when we are actually hungry.

We eat in the car, while on the phone, while watching TV or on the computer, while reading books, while making dinner, and hopefully, sometimes, even while sitting at a table.

Some of us eat healthy one day and not the next. Some of us feel good about our bodies and what they look like on the outside (at least on some days), and some of us absolutely do not ever feel good about the way we look.

Some of us, despite that fact that we look like we have perfect bodies, are agonizing over the last five pounds, and some of us, despite the fact that we are fit and happy, are tormented because we are seen as overweight.

Some of us are very controlling about what we eat, and some of us are very controlled by what we eat.

Some of us count calories all day long, survive on fake food, or try to eat how we deem to be absolutely perfectly, sometimes to a fault.

For all of us, food is an issue. An issue that can, at times, make us feel crazy.

I Get It. I Lived It. But Not Anymore.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR - LISA LEWTAN


The founder of Healthy, Happy, and Hip, Lisa Lewtan is a healthy living strategist and a graduate of the Institute for Integrative Nutrition.

Using skills she developed as a successful technology entrepreneur, Lewtan self-hacked her own mind and body to restore her health and wellness. She now uses those same skills to help superstars slow down, chill out, improve their relationship with food, look good, and feel great.

Lewtan’s articles have been featured in numerous publications, including the Huffington Post, Better after 50, and MindBodyGreen. Visit www.HealthyHappyandHip.com to learn more about Lewtan’s private coaching sessions, workshops, and retreats.

Cheers,
Jassie

Thursday, April 7, 2016

What Are Your Cravings??



Looking back on the story of my debut children's book, I can imagine the various young readers who think like Seema. She may be the one sister who drives her brother up the wall with her crazy demands.

I mean, who wouldn't find her cravings for the intense addiction to the Indian delicacy, the laddoos relatable? All of us surely have unusual and quirky cravings and addictions, which we will want to attain at any cost. Such was the fun or creating an enjoyable character like Seema. Sharad, on the other hand was a perfect brother for her, miserably caving into her demands. Seema had tapped into his craving for chocolate as a form of slowly killing the patience in him. Haha, the love of siblings is simply irksome.

If kids had loved the craze of Seema in the first book, I have a special surprise awaiting them for the upcoming 5 months. The second instalment is just around the corner. This time round, the story will be told from Seema's brother, Sharad's viewpoint. His love for robotics will be put to the test in 'Lil Mr Depressed' (tentative title).

So what are your cravings, my dear introverts? Feel free to share!!!

Cheers,
Jassie